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World War II Fiscal Policies and the End of the Great Depression

J. R. Vernon
The Journal of Economic History
Vol. 54, No. 4 (Dec., 1994), pp. 850-868
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2123613
Page Count: 19
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World War II Fiscal Policies and the End of the Great Depression
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Abstract

The United States economy completed its recovery from the Great Depression in 1942, restoring full-employment output in that year after 12 years of below-full-employment performance. Fiscal policies were not the most important factor in the 1933 through 1940 phase of the recovery, but they became the most important factor after 1940, when the recovery was less than half-complete. World War II fiscal policies were, then, instrumental in the overall restoration of full-employment performance.

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