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New Light on Plant Domestication and the Origins of Agriculture: A Review

David R. Harris
Geographical Review
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Jan., 1967), pp. 90-107
DOI: 10.2307/212761
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/212761
Page Count: 18
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New Light on Plant Domestication and the Origins of Agriculture: A Review
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Abstract

Progress in our understanding of how, where, and when agriculture originated depends as much on the collation of evidence from diverse fields as on specialized investigations. A general assessment of recent advances in the study of agricultural origins is therefore presented. Some current work by botanists on the processes of plant domestication is reviewed, and archeological evidence bearing on the questions of where and when agriculture began is considered regionally for Eurasia, Africa, and Middle and South America. It is concluded that the beginnings of plant domestication may lie in remote times before the development of food-crop agriculture.

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