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Patterns of Morbidity and Mortality in Mexico City

David J. Fox
Geographical Review
Vol. 62, No. 2 (Apr., 1972), pp. 151-185
DOI: 10.2307/213211
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/213211
Page Count: 35
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Patterns of Morbidity and Mortality in Mexico City
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Abstract

This paper is the first attempt to show a relationship between the distribution of ill health and a poor domestic environment in Mexico City. In Mexico reliable information on morbidity and mortality that is suitable for geographical analysis is rare, though an immunological investigation has demonstrated the coincidence of typhoid infection and inadequate housing. Information from the death certificates of residents of three selected cuarteles of Mexico City who died during three months of 1965 has been organized by housing areas; this reveals strong associations between crude death rates both from particular diseases and among particular age groups and certain elements in the home environment. Regression analysis has permitted maps of mortality in the city to be drawn for the first time. Factor analysis emphasizes the association of certain fatal diseases with poor living conditions. Cluster analysis identifies areas with essentially similar combinations of health and domestic characteristics. The desirability of changing existing health district boundaries is made clear. The mortality spectrum of the three cuarteles is shown to be typical of that of the whole city, and this allows comparisons to be made with other cities in Latin America and elsewhere.

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