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Fertility Transition in Syria: From Implicit Population Policy to Explicit Economic Crisis

Youssef Courbage
International Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 20, No. 4 (Dec., 1994), pp. 142-146
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2133259
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2133259
Page Count: 5
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Fertility Transition in Syria: From Implicit Population Policy to Explicit Economic Crisis
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Abstract

Despite rapid population growth, Syria's government has been reluctant to intervene directly, preferring to rely on economic development and the education and employment of women to reduce family size. During the 1970s, despite prosperity and great gains in women's education, the birth-rate remained consistently high. Education of women did not lead to their widespread employment until the 1980s, when a stagnating economy made it necessary for families to seek a second income. Since the mid 1980s, the birthrate has fallen sharply, from 45 births per 1,000 population in 1985 to 33 per 1,000 in 1990.

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