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Reproductive Health Counseling For Young Men: What Does It Do?

Ross Danielson, Shirley Marcy, Anne Plunkett, William Wiest and Merwyn R. Greenlick
Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 22, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1990), pp. 115-121
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2135642
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135642
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reproductive Health Counseling For Young Men: What Does It Do?
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Abstract

A reproductive health intervention combining a highly explicit half-hour slide-tape program with a personal health consultation was provided to male patients aged 15-18 at a large health maintenance organization. A test of the consultation's impact against a control group provides no support for the argument that highly explicit instruction in contraception encourages early initiation of intercourse. In fact, the consultation may have reduced pressure to become sexually active among young men who had never had sexual intercourse. There is also some evidence that the consultation helped improve the effectiveness of contraceptive practice among the men who were sexually active at follow-up; those exposed to the consultation were more likely than those who were not to report that their last intercourse was protected by the pill and that their main method of contraception in the previous year was the pill. Compared with those in the control group, patients who received the health consultation scored higher on measures of fertility knowledge and knowledge of the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS. Furthermore, the young men who had the consultation were more likely to have practiced testicular self-examination. In many cases, however, the positive effects of the consultation were stronger or were only statistically significant among those who had not been sexually active at the time of the baseline survey.

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