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Determinants of Early Implant Discontinuation Among Low-Income Women

Debra Kalmuss, Andrew R. Davidson, Linda F. Cushman, Stephen Heartwell and Marvin Rulin
Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 28, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1996), pp. 256-260
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2136054
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136054
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Determinants of Early Implant Discontinuation Among Low-Income Women
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Abstract

The determinants of contraceptive implant discontinuation within six months of insertion were examined among 786 low-income women attending family planning clinics in three U.S. cities. The six-month cumulative life-table discontinuation rate was 7.6%. Menstrual side effects were the most common reasons given for early implant removal, although women who discontinued use were no more likely than those who continued with the method to report menstrual irregularities. Women who opted for early removal were more likely than those who continued with the method to experience headaches, hair loss, weight gain and arm infection. Logistic regression analysis indicates that dissatisfaction with prior contraceptive methods, a partner who wants a child within the next two years, perceived pressure from health care providers to choose the implant, exposure to negative media coverage and the number of implant side effects significantly predict early implant discontinuation. Women's social and demographic characteristics, Medicaid status and motivation to avoid an unplanned pregnancy were not significantly related to early removal.

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