Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

A New Perspective on the Relationships Among Race, Social Class, and Psychological Distress

Ronald C. Kessler and Harold W. Neighbors
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 27, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 107-115
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136310
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
A New Perspective on the Relationships Among Race, Social Class, and Psychological Distress
Preview not available

Abstract

Over the past decade, a body of research has developed which purports to show that the well-established relationship between race and psychological distress is due entirely to social class. In our paper we demonstrate that this view is incorrect: Most prior research has assumed that the effects of race and social class are additive; our analysis shows that they are actually interactive. The form of interaction is such that the true effect of race is suppressed and the true effect of social class is magnified in a model that fails to take the interaction into consideration. An analysis of eight different epidemiologic surveys documents this result and shows that race differences in psychological distress are particularly pronounced among people with low incomes. On the basis of this result we call for renewed interest in the effect of race on mental health.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115