Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Social Bonding Theory and Adolescent Cigarette Smoking: A Longitudinal Analysis

Marvin D. Krohn, James L. Massey, William F. Skinner and Ronald M. Lauer
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 24, No. 4 (Dec., 1983), pp. 337-349
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136400
Page Count: 13
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Social Bonding Theory and Adolescent Cigarette Smoking: A Longitudinal Analysis
Preview not available

Abstract

The viability of a social bonding explanation of adolescent cigarette smoking is examined within a longitudinal design. The research is based on a two-wave panel study of 1405 students in grades 7 through 12. The results generally support the hypothesis that adolescents' ties to aspects of conventional society are important in constraining deviant behavior. Specifically, beliefs and commitment to education were found to have the strongest constraining effect. However, other variables originally identified in the perspective were not negatively related to cigarette smoking. The significance of the results for our understanding of both adolescent cigarette smoking and social bonding theory is discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349