Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Effect of Religious Commitment on Suicide: A Cross-National Analysis

Steven Stack
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 24, No. 4 (Dec., 1983), pp. 362-374
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136402
Page Count: 13
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The Effect of Religious Commitment on Suicide: A Cross-National Analysis
Preview not available

Abstract

Research on the relationship of religion and suicide has relied almost exclusively on the concept of religious integration as a causal variable. The present paper proposes an alternative linkage, based on the concept of religious commitment. A theory is developed that argues that a high level of commitment to a few life-preserving religious beliefs, values, and practices will lower suicide levels. Control variables are taken from the industrialization and the neglected gender-equality perspectives on suicide. A multiple regression analysis of suicide rates from 25 nations indicates that religious commitment is negatively related to the total suicide rate. However, this relationship holds only for females, the group traditionally most committed to religion. Both the industrialization and gender-equality variables were more closely associated with the variance in age- and gender-specific suicide rates than was the religious variable.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369
  • Thumbnail: Page 
370
    370
  • Thumbnail: Page 
371
    371
  • Thumbnail: Page 
372
    372
  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
  • Thumbnail: Page 
374
    374