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Neighborhood Types and Community Reaction to the Mentally Ill: A Paradox of Intensity

Steven P. Segal, Jim Baumohl and Edwin W. Moyles
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 21, No. 4 (Dec., 1980), pp. 345-359
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136411
Page Count: 15
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Neighborhood Types and Community Reaction to the Mentally Ill: A Paradox of Intensity
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Abstract

Employing data from a statewide study of sheltered-care residents and facilities in California, combined with archival data describing the census tracts in which these facilities are located, the authors analyze the impact of community reaction on sheltered-care residents in different types of neighborhoods. Findings suggest that conservative middle-class communities are most likely to exhibit extreme negative reactions that can have a deleterious impact on the social integration of residents in community care. Liberal, nontraditional neighborhoods conform most closely to the ideal accepting community. In liberal, nontraditional neighborhoods and conservative working-class neighborhoods a moderate level of community reaction actually facilitates the social integration of sheltered-care residents.

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