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Anticipatory Socialization and Role Stress among Registered Nurses

Arthur P. Brief, Mary Van Sell, Ramon J. Aldag and Nancy Melone
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 20, No. 2 (Jun., 1979), pp. 161-166
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136436
Page Count: 6
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Anticipatory Socialization and Role Stress among Registered Nurses
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Abstract

Hypotheses derived from a developmental model of the role-socialization process were tested using a sample of 117 registered nurses. Specifically, the impact of type of nursing education (conceptualized as the anticipatory stage of the socialization process) on role stresses experienced on the job was explored. It was found that role stress increased with the degree of professional training, baccalaureate nurses experiencing the greatest stress. Further, it was found that time on the job did not mitigate these effects. Implications for socialization models and the delivery of health care are discussed.

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