Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Client Satisfaction and the Organization of Medical Practice: Why Time Counts

Catherine E. Ross, Blair Wheaton and Raymond S. Duff
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 22, No. 3 (Sep., 1981), pp. 243-255
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136519
Page Count: 13
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Client Satisfaction and the Organization of Medical Practice: Why Time Counts
Preview not available

Abstract

We examine client satisfaction with medical practices that range in organizational complexity from fee-for-service solo practice to large prepaid bueaucratically organized multispecialty groups. Although theories and data in the literature led us to expect differences in client satisfaction between the two extremes on the organizational continuum, we initially found none. In trying to account for this nondifference, we specified a model in which expectations about medical care and experiences with care counteract each other. Specifically, clients enter HMOs and other large prepaid groups with negative expectations, whereas they enter solo practice with positive expectations. However, their experiences with the medical care in solo practice tend to be negative compared with the experiences of clients in large groups. (Experiences include factors such as the number of minutes in the visit, the quality of the physician's technical care, and the quality of the "caring" psychosocial aspects of the interaction.) Experiences accumulate, and over time they begin to offset expectations. Thus, when time is not taken into account, there appears to be no difference in client satisfaction between the two types of practices. We develop a model that specifies the changing satisfaction patterns over time in different types of practices, and we explain these changes in terms of accumulating experiences.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
251
    251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
252
    252
  • Thumbnail: Page 
253
    253
  • Thumbnail: Page 
254
    254
  • Thumbnail: Page 
255
    255