If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Note on the Trend in Sex Differences in Psychological Distress

Sara S. McLanahan and Jennifer L. Glass
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 26, No. 4 (Dec., 1985), pp. 328-336
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136656
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Note on the Trend in Sex Differences in Psychological Distress
Preview not available

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that sex differences in psychological distress have declined over the past several decades. Most commonly, the decline is attributed to increases in women's participation in the labor force, which is thought to have improved the mental health of women while reducing the mental health of men (i.e., husbands). Our paper examines the effect of changes in men's employment patterns during the past two decades. The findings show that declines in men's employment are as important as increases in women's employment in accounting for the sex trend in psychological distress.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332
  • Thumbnail: Page 
333
    333
  • Thumbnail: Page 
334
    334
  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336