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Modeling the Quality of Women's Birth Experience

Susan G. Doering, Doris R. Entwisle and Daniel Quinlan
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 21, No. 1 (Mar., 1980), pp. 12-21
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136690
Page Count: 10
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Modeling the Quality of Women's Birth Experience
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Abstract

A longitudinal study of 120 couples over the period when they became first-time parents reveals that formal preparation for the birth event (learning in classrooms and from books) improves women's birth enjoyment. Such preparation often involves husbands and encourages them to participate at the birth. A recursive model was estimated supporting the notions that being able to remain in control is a major benefit conferred upon a woman by preparation and that the social support afforded by the husband's presence at the birth contributes both directly and indirectly to the enhancement of the woman's birth experience. The findings are interpreted in line with Janis' stress theory.

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