Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Race Differences in Involuntary Hospitalization: Psychiatric vs. Labeling Perspectives

Sarah Rosenfield
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 25, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 14-23
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136701
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Race Differences in Involuntary Hospitalization: Psychiatric vs. Labeling Perspectives
Preview not available

Abstract

In this paper, race differences in mental hospitalization are examined, controlling for clinical condition and social class. Nonwhite males are found to be involuntarily hospitalized more often than are white males. Psychiatric and labeling perspectives offer conflicting explanations for these differences in societal reactions. Psychiatric explanations of behavior and attitudes toward treatment and labeling explanations of social distance and pathways to treatment are investigated. Pathways to treatment, specifically greater police involvement in nonwhites' entry into treatment, explains nonwhite males' greater involuntary hospitalization.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23