Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Effect of Psychological Distress on Physician Utilization: A Prospective Study

Richard Tessler, David Mechanic and Margaret Dimond
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 17, No. 4 (Dec., 1976), pp. 353-364
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136713
Page Count: 12
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The Effect of Psychological Distress on Physician Utilization: A Prospective Study
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper examines the hypothesis that psychological distress is causally related to physician utilization among enrollees in a prepaid group practice. Measures of distress are constructed from questions included in a survey interview, while the utilization data come from medical records. Distress levels were measured prior to the period of utilization studied. The results show a positive relationship between distress and physician utilization, which persists even when a variety of sociodemographic, attitudinal, and health status variables have been controlled. The results are discussed in terms of a perspective that emphasizes social-psychological needs as triggers for physician utilization.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353
  • Thumbnail: Page 
354
    354
  • Thumbnail: Page 
355
    355
  • Thumbnail: Page 
356
    356
  • Thumbnail: Page 
357
    357
  • Thumbnail: Page 
358
    358
  • Thumbnail: Page 
359
    359
  • Thumbnail: Page 
360
    360
  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364