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Psychosocial Predictors of Illness Behavior and Failure in Stressful Training

Richard H. Rahe, R. J. Biersner, David H. Ryman and Ransom J. Arthur
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 13, No. 4 (Dec., 1972), pp. 393-397
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136831
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

A unit score developed from the Schedule of Recent Experience (SRE) and the total "yes" score of the Cornell Medical Index (CMI) Health-Questionnaire were found to be valid predictors of dispensary visits made during stressful Underwater Demolition Team (UDT) training. When the SRE and CMI scores were taken together, their multiple correlation with subjects' dispensary visits was found to be significantly higher than the correlations of either one alone. Subjects' SRE scores showed highest correlation with those men who eventually dropped from training because of medical problems ("approved" illness behavior). Subjects' CMI scores were seen to have an unique correlation with those men who dropped from training voluntarily–often with minor illness symptoms ("unapproved" illness behavior). In addition, subjects' CMI scores showed a consistent significant correlation with failure to complete UDT training.

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