Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

A Multivariate Model of the Determinants of Cigarette Smoking Among Adolescents

Felipe G. Castro, Ebrahim Maddahian, Michael D. Newcomb and P. M. Bentler
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 28, No. 3 (Sep., 1987), pp. 273-289
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136846
Page Count: 17
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
A Multivariate Model of the Determinants of Cigarette Smoking Among Adolescents
Preview not available

Abstract

A multivariate stress-coping model was used to test a set of hypotheses about antecedents to cigarette smoking in a general sample of adolescents. In corroboration with other studies, the peer influence factor was the strongest predictor of cigarette smoking. However, the data supported a more complex mediational model in which social conformity, along with peer influence, appeared as mediators between stress factors (disruptive family events and perceived stressfulness) and the coping response factor of cigarette smoking. Ethnic group comparisons between white, black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific adolescents on variables relevant to cigarette smoking revealed a pattern in which the highest vulnerability was observed for blacks, intermediate risk for smoking was observed for Hispanics and whites, and lowest vulnerability was observed for Pacific Asians. Latent variable measurement models for each ethnic group revealed that adequate indicators of the two stress factors and the social conformity factor were found for whites, whereas one or more of these indicators were inadequately identified for each of the ethnic groups. This suggests that important cultural differences exist in the assessment of these constructs. Results also indicate that smoking prevention/cessation programs should do more than teach resistance to social influence, i.e., saying "no" to friends' suggestions to smoke cigarettes. More effective interventions, especially for preventing cigarette smoking among adolescents, may require attention to other factors which precede an affiliation with cigarette smoking peers (peer influence), such as attention to disruptive or stressful family environments in addition to attention to any existing deficits in stress-coping skills, and to certain aspects of personality such as nonconformity/rebelliousness.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
284
    284
  • Thumbnail: Page 
285
    285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
286
    286
  • Thumbnail: Page 
287
    287
  • Thumbnail: Page 
288
    288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289