Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Sex Differences in Distress: The Impact of Gender and Work Roles

Mary Clare Lennon
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 28, No. 3 (Sep., 1987), pp. 290-305
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136847
Page Count: 16
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Sex Differences in Distress: The Impact of Gender and Work Roles
Preview not available

Abstract

Investigators have suggested that social roles, particularly gender roles, may explain the tendency for women to have higher rates of demoralization than men. Results of studies comparing employed women, employed men, and housewives have been mixed, however, and investigators have begun to consider additional explanatory factors. This paper focuses on a potential source of gender differences in distress that has received relatively little attention: the workplace itself. I consider the extent to which work conditions and the sexual segregation of occupations are related to two measures of distress: demoralization, which is more prevalent among women, and drinking, which is more prevalent among men. Multiple regression analyses indicate that the only work-related factors associated with demoralization are substantive complexity and full-time work, and these have an effect among women only. Full-time work and low levels of complexity are associated with higher levels of demoralization among women. Substantive complexity is also associated with drinking, but only among men; as complexity declines, levels of drinking increase. These findings indicate the importance of considering work-related factors and measures of distress associated differentially with gender when investigating gender differences in distress.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
293
    293
  • Thumbnail: Page 
294
    294
  • Thumbnail: Page 
295
    295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305