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Work Alienation and Problem Alcohol Behavior

Edward S. Greenberg and Leon Grunberg
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 36, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 83-102
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137289
Page Count: 20
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Work Alienation and Problem Alcohol Behavior
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Abstract

Using a sample of production workers from union, nonunion, producer cooperative, and employee stock ownership plan (ESOP) wood products mills in the Northwest, we test the general proposition that work alienation, defined as low job autonomy, low use of capacities, and lack of participation in decision-making in the workplace, is associated with heavy drinking and negative consequences from drinking. We find that the general proposition is supported, but that the pathways tend to be indirect rather than direct, mediated by feelings of job satisfaction and respondents' beliefs about the utility of drinking as a means of coping.

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