Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Gender Differences in Child Health: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys

Kenneth Hill and Dawn M. Upchurch
Population and Development Review
Vol. 21, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 127-151
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/2137416
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137416
Page Count: 25
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($16.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Gender Differences in Child Health: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys
Preview not available

Abstract

Data from the Demographic and Health Surveys indicate that girls in many developing countries have higher mortality in childhood relative to boys than would be expected given the experience of European-origin populations at similar levels of mortality. This mortality disadvantage is particularly large between the ages of 1 and 5, and in the countries of the Middle East. Surprisingly, girls show no disadvantage for a number of health status indicators. They are reported to suffer less often from respiratory and diarrheal infections, are less likely to be stunted or wasted, and are as likely as boys to be immunized. Only in use of health services do girls show lower rates than boys. Most of the health status indicators are uncorrelated with the female mortality disadvantage, though high immunization levels relative to boys are associated with low mortality disadvantages. The association with immunization remains significant even when educational differences are controlled.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151