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Women's Socioeconomic Position and Contraceptive Behavior in Togo

Anastasia J. Gage
Studies in Family Planning
Vol. 26, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1995), pp. 264-277
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/2138012
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2138012
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Women's Socioeconomic Position and Contraceptive Behavior in Togo
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Abstract

Few studies have examined empirically the influence of women's position on contraceptive behavior in sub-Saharan Africa. Using data from the 1988 Togo Demographic and Health Survey, this article explores the linkages between various indicators of women's position and spousal communication about family planning and contraceptive use. The results highlight the importance to their contraceptive behavior of women's economic power and individual control over choice of partner. The likelihood of spousal communication about family planning and modern contraceptive use is significantly higher among women who exercised complete control over selection of partner than among those with arranged marriages. Women who work for cash are significantly more likely than those who do not to communicate with their spouses about family planning, particularly if they participate in rotating credit or savings schemes. Such participation also increases significantly the likelihood of ever using traditional and modern methods of contraception.

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