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Journal Article

The Strategic Approach to Contraceptive Introduction

Ruth Simmons, Peter Hall, Juan Diaz, Margarita Diaz, Peter Fajans and Jay Satia
Studies in Family Planning
Vol. 28, No. 2 (Jun., 1997), pp. 79-94
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/2138111
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2138111
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Strategic Approach to Contraceptive Introduction
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Abstract

The introduction of new contraceptive technologies has great potential for expanding contraceptive choice, but in practice, benefits have not always materialized as new methods have been added to public-sector programs. In response to lessons from the past, the UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP) has taken major steps to develop a new approach and to support governments interested in its implementation. After reviewing previous experience with contraceptive introduction, the article outlines the strategic approach and discusses lessons from eight countries. This new approach shifts attention from promotion of a particular technology to an emphasis on the method mix, the capacity to provide services with quality of care, reproductive choice, and users' perspectives and needs. It also suggests that technology choice should be undertaken through a participatory process that begins with an assessment of the need for contraceptive introduction and is followed by research and policy and program development. Initial results from Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Chile, Myanmar, South Africa, Vietnam, and Zambia confirm the value of the new approach.

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