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Estimates of New Zealand Maori Vital Rates from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to World War I

D. I. Pool
Population Studies
Vol. 27, No. 1 (Mar., 1973), pp. 117-125
DOI: 10.2307/2173457
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2173457
Page Count: 9
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Estimates of New Zealand Maori Vital Rates from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to World War I
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Abstract

Indigenous populations in the Pacific and elsewhere decreased in size during the early period of European colonization. A logically appealing explanation would be that this resulted from very high death rates, while birth rates were merely high, but there are few data to support or reject such a contention. Moreover, against this case must be placed the persistent reports that the declines resulted from `psychological depression following contact'; reports which appear to be based on a confusion between fertility levels and replacement levels. This paper reviews the data on the Maori population and provides a series of estimates which lend support to the argument that both fertility and mortality levels were high.

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