Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Income and Inequality as Determinants of Mortality: An International Cross-Section Analysis

G. B. Rodgers
Population Studies
Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jul., 1979), pp. 343-351
DOI: 10.2307/2173539
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2173539
Page Count: 9
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Income and Inequality as Determinants of Mortality: An International Cross-Section Analysis
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper analyses the effects of income and income distribution on mortality. The likely relation between income and mortality for individuals is discussed, and implications for the determinants of mortality at the community level inferred. Measures of income inequality are likely to be related to mortality on aggregate data because of the non-linearity of income effects. An international cross-section analysis is then undertaken in which different measures of income and income distribution are investigated as determinants of mortality, with life expectancy at birth and age five, and infant mortality taken as measures of the dependent variable. It is found that income distribution is consistently and strongly related to mortality; in a relatively inegalitarian country life expectancy may be between five and ten years lower than in a more egalitarian country.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351