Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Malthusian Population Theory and Indian Famine Policy in the Nineteenth Century

S. Ambirajan
Population Studies
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Mar., 1976), pp. 5-14
DOI: 10.2307/2173660
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2173660
Page Count: 10
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Malthusian Population Theory and Indian Famine Policy in the Nineteenth Century
Preview not available

Abstract

Given the fact that almost all members of the Indian civil service in the nineteenth century were trained in Britain and consequently liable to be influenced by views prevailing there, this paper examines the role of Malthusian population theory in forming the principles behind British famine policy in India. The conclusion is that not only did Malthusian population theory provide the intellectual basis for the Indian administration's long-run perspective about Indian famines, but also buttressed its largely negative approach to famine relief in the short run.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14