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Equivalence Scale Relativities Revisited

James Banks and Paul Johnson
The Economic Journal
Vol. 104, No. 425 (Jul., 1994), pp. 883-890
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Royal Economic Society
DOI: 10.2307/2234982
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2234982
Page Count: 8
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Equivalence Scale Relativities Revisited
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Abstract

Recent studies have assessed the impact of choice of equivalence scale on economists' measurement of the equivalent income distribution. One particular study (Coulter, Cowell and Jenkins (1992)) has found that equivalence scales used in the UK official statistics `provide lower estimates of the extent of inequality and poverty than do other scales'. In this paper we demonstrate that these kind of results are dependent on the particular year of data and equivalence scale specification that is used and are not properties intrinsic to particular methodologies. Results are also not robust to the use of more recent UK microeconomic data.

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