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Science and Values in the Regulatory Process

Nicholas A. Ashford
Statistical Science
Vol. 3, No. 3 (Aug., 1988), pp. 377-383
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2245954
Page Count: 7
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Science and Values in the Regulatory Process
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Abstract

This article provides a framework for consideration of values in the use of science in the regulatory process. The science in question includes both the assessment of technologic risk and the assessment of technologic options to reduce those risks. The focus of the inquiry is on the role of the scientist and engineer as analyst or assessor. The difficulties in separating facts and values will be addressed by focusing on the central question: what level of evidence is sufficient to trigger a requirement for regulatory action? For the purposes of this article, the regulatory process includes notification of risks to interested parties, control of technologic hazards and compensation for harm caused by technology. The discussion will address the problems in achieving both a fair outcome and a fair process in the regulatory use of science.

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