Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Braunton Burrows: Mineral Nutrient Status of the Dune Soils

A. J. Willis and E. W. Yemm
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 49, No. 2 (Jun., 1961), pp. 377-390
DOI: 10.2307/2257270
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2257270
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Braunton Burrows: Mineral Nutrient Status of the Dune Soils
Preview not available

Abstract

1. The mineral nutrient status of three types of dune soil (freshly blown sand, soil of dry dune pasture and of lichen-type pasture) was investigated by means of tomato plants used as indicators. The effects on the growth and composition of turf transplants of the addition of mineral nutrients were also studied. 2. All the soils contained sufficient supplies of minor mineral nutrients (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, B, Mo) for unrestricted plant growth. There were, however, severe deficiencies of nitrogen and phosphorus, especially in the freshly blown coarse sand; potassium was also in limiting supply. 3. Addition of a solution containing the chief major nutrients to turf transplants under greenhouse conditions resulted in two or three times as much growth as in transplants given purified water only. Important changes in composition of the turf transplants were found; grasses (Agrostis stolonifera, Festuca rubra, Poa pratensis ssp. subcaerulea) became overwhelmingly dominant when nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium were added in adequate amounts. When nitrogen was supplied alone, however, and phosphorus was limiting, Carex flacca increased rather than Agrostis in transplants from damp pasture. 4. The sparse growth and open character of much of the natural vegetation of the Burrows appear to be mainly attributable to the low levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in the soils.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
380
    380
  • Thumbnail: Page 
381
    381
  • Thumbnail: Page 
382
    382
  • Thumbnail: Page 
383
    383
  • Thumbnail: Page 
384
    384
  • Thumbnail: Page 
385
    385
  • Thumbnail: Page 
386
    386
  • Thumbnail: Page 
387
    387
  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388
  • Thumbnail: Page 
389
    389
  • Thumbnail: Page 
390
    390