Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Vegetation of Antigua, West Indies

A. R. Loveless
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 48, No. 3 (Oct., 1960), pp. 495-527
DOI: 10.2307/2257330
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2257330
Page Count: 35
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Vegetation of Antigua, West Indies
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Antigua is divided naturally into three distinct physiographical regions: a mountainous volcanic region in the south-west, a central plain, and a relatively low-lying limestone region in the north and east. 2. The local climatic belts are arranged in a more or less concentric series around the highest peaks in the volcanic region. 3. Owing to the periodicity of the rainfall much of the `natural' vegetation can be referred to formations belonging to the Seasonal and Dry Evergreen formation-series of Beard's classification for tropical American vegetation. The distinction between Seasonal and Dry Evergreen vegetation in Antigua is clearly edaphic. 4. Three Seasonal formations (Evergreen Seasonal forest, Semi-Evergreen Seasonal forest, and Deciduous Seasonal forest) and three Dry Evergreen formations (Dry Evergreen thicket, Evergreen bushland, and Littoral Rock Pavement vegetation) can be distinguished. Quantitative data are given for the leaf characteristics of the phanerophytes in these formations. 5. Edaphic formations are represented by the Coastal communities (Submerged Marine vegetation, Mangrove vegetation, and Strand vegetation), Riparian woodland, and the Inland Fresh- and Brackish-water communities. 6. Biotic communities include various types of Grassland, Waste bushlands and Weeds of cultivated land. In these biotic communities the native flora has been largely replaced by introductions from the Old World.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498
  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500
  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522
  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527