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Journal Article

The Response of Grasslands on Sugar-Limestone in Teesdale to Application of Phosphorus and Nitrogen

D. W. Jeffrey and C. D. Pigott
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 61, No. 1 (Mar., 1973), pp. 85-92
DOI: 10.2307/2258918
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2258918
Page Count: 9

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Topics: Phosphates, Vegetation, Nitrogen, Sward, Grasses, Species, Grassland soils, Outcrops, Angiosperms, Limestones
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The Response of Grasslands on Sugar-Limestone in Teesdale to Application of Phosphorus and Nitrogen
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Abstract

Experiments entailing exclusion of sheep and application of nitrogen and phosphate have been carried out on grassland on shallow soils over metamorphosed limestone at about 470 m above sea-level in upper Teesdale. Addition of calcium dihydrogen phosphate caused a large increase in the amounts of Festuca ovina, F. rubra and A. stolonifera in a flushed site, with a corresponding decrease in the quantity of Kobresia simpliciuscula. A large increase in Festuca ovina, but not of Sesleria albicans, was obtained in a well-drained site. Addition of ammonium nitrate has little effect on the vegetation in the flushed site but causes a small change in the well-drained site. The only apparent change after excluding sheep from the site for 3 years was an increase in Sesleria albicans in the well-drained site.

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