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Effects of Salinity and Inundation on the Growth of Agrostis Stolonifera and Juncus Gerardii

J. Rozema and B. Blom
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Mar., 1977), pp. 213-222
DOI: 10.2307/2259075
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2259075
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Salinity and Inundation on the Growth of Agrostis Stolonifera and Juncus Gerardii
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Abstract

Maritime populations of Agrostis stolonifera L. and Juncus gerardii Lois. were grown from seed in sand culture at three levels of inundation and two concentrations of sodium chloride. Biomass production, stolon length and internode length were stimulated in Agrostis stolonifera by flooding, whereas biomass, shoot height and rhizome length were depressed in Juncus gerardii. Addition of seawater markedly depressed the growth of Agrostis stolonifera, whereas that of Juncus gerardii was not significantly affected. Absence of significant differences in degree of succulence as a result of salinity indicates an unimportant role of succulence as a salt regulation mechanism in both species. Increasing uptake of sodium did not seem to reduce the potassium content, whilst neither inundation nor salinity had a significant effect upon the calcium or magnesium content of either species. Inundation caused an increased iron and manganese content of the root material, but phosphorus deficiency in shoots did not occur. The metabolic adaptations to waterlogging of these two flooding-tolerant species did not seem to include malate accumulation or stimulation of nitrate reductase activity.

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