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Journal Article

Interference in Dune Annuals: Spatial Pattern and Neighbourhood Effects

Richard N. Mack and John L. Harper
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 65, No. 2 (Jul., 1977), pp. 345-363
DOI: 10.2307/2259487
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2259487
Page Count: 19

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Topics: Plants, Species, Biomass, Dunes, Biomass production, Annuals, Density, Seed production, Sowing, Population ecology
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Interference in Dune Annuals: Spatial Pattern and Neighbourhood Effects
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Abstract

Interference among four autumn-germinating annuals (Cerastium atrovirens, Mibora minima, Phleum arenarium and Vulpia fasciculata) native to the stabilized dunes near Aberffraw, Anglesey, North Wales, was examined at the individual plant level in monocultures, in all combinations of two species in mixture, and in a mixture of all four species. Frequency histograms of individual plant weights for each species from the four-species mixtures became skewed through time. Species with low competitive ability had a larger proportion of the cohort in the smaller size classes. Density is a crude abstraction of the precise neighbourhood relationship of individuals: up to 69% of variance in individual plant weight and fecundity is accounted for by linear regression on a measure of neighbourhood effects that takes into account the weight, distance and angular dispersion of neighbours within 2 cm.

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