If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Competition and Spacing in Plant Communities: The Arizona Upland Association

Richard I. Yeaton, Joseph Travis and Ellen Gilinsky
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 65, No. 2 (Jul., 1977), pp. 587-595
DOI: 10.2307/2259503
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2259503
Page Count: 9
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Competition and Spacing in Plant Communities: The Arizona Upland Association
Preview not available

Abstract

Spacing and competition were studied within and between species of the `Arizona upland association' in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. Larrea tridentata, Franseria deltoidea, Opuntia fulgida, Carnegiea gigantea, and Fouquieria splendens comprise 95% of the individuals and 94% of the plant cover in the area studied. All intraspecific nearest-neighbour comparisons show that competition is occurring. Larrea tridentata competes with all species studied except Carnegiea gigantea, Franseria deltoidea competes only with Larrea tridentata, while there is no evidence of Carnegiea gigantea competing with other species (its interaction with Opuntia fulgida could not be determined). The root system of Larrea tridentata occupies a position intermediate between and overlapping those of Franseria deltoidea and Opuntia fulgida and as a result competes with both. Opuntia and Franseria do not compete as their root systems are segregated vertically from each other in the soil. It is suggested that vertical separation of root systems is the mechanism through which interspecific competition is reduced and co-existence maintained between these associated species of plants.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
587
    587
  • Thumbnail: Page 
588
    588
  • Thumbnail: Page 
589
    589
  • Thumbnail: Page 
590
    590
  • Thumbnail: Page 
591
    591
  • Thumbnail: Page 
592
    592
  • Thumbnail: Page 
593
    593
  • Thumbnail: Page 
594
    594
  • Thumbnail: Page 
595
    595