Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Effect of Competition and Nutrient Availability on the Growth and Reproduction of Ipomoea Hederacea in an Abandoned Old Field

D. F. Whigham
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 72, No. 3 (Nov., 1984), pp. 721-730
DOI: 10.2307/2259527
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2259527
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of Competition and Nutrient Availability on the Growth and Reproduction of Ipomoea Hederacea in an Abandoned Old Field
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Ipomoea hederacea, a common weed in cultivated fields of eastern North America, disappears quickly following abandonment of farming. (2) The effects of competition and nitrogen addition on the growth and reproduction of I. hederacea were studied during the first year of abandonment. (3) Competition and fertilization had significant absolute effects on almost all biomass variables measured and few affects on the same variables when they were expressed as percentages of total biomass. (4) Plants in a fertilized and cleared plot were larger and produced more seed than plants from two other treatment plots and the control plot. Plants in an unfertilized and cleared plot were similar to plants in a fertilized plot which had not been cleared. Plants in a plot which was neither fertilized nor cleared were smaller and produced very few seeds compared with plants in the three treated plots. (5) The results suggest than I. hederacea is eliminated during succession because it is a poor competitor for nitrogen, and that the main result of the competition is a reduction in below-ground biomass.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
721
    721
  • Thumbnail: Page 
722
    722
  • Thumbnail: Page 
723
    723
  • Thumbnail: Page 
724
    724
  • Thumbnail: Page 
725
    725
  • Thumbnail: Page 
726
    726
  • Thumbnail: Page 
727
    727
  • Thumbnail: Page 
728
    728
  • Thumbnail: Page 
729
    729
  • Thumbnail: Page 
730
    730