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The Effect of Sand Deposits on the Growth and Morphology of Ammophila Breviligulata

D. J. Disraeli
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 72, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 145-154
DOI: 10.2307/2260010
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2260010
Page Count: 10
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The Effect of Sand Deposits on the Growth and Morphology of Ammophila Breviligulata
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Abstract

(1) The effects of sand deposition on the growth and morphology of Ammophila breviligulata were studied in the field. (2) Both below- and above-ground biomass increased as depth of sand-burial increased. On stable dunes compared with mobile ones, a greater below-ground biomass was supported by a relatively smaller above-ground biomass. (3) Leaf area was directly related to sand burial. Peak leaf area of 23.5 cm2 g-1 fresh weight occurred with 22 cm of sand burial. Plant height increased exponentially with increased sand burial and reached a maximum of 64.5 cm with 59 cm of sand. (4) The number of buds per tiller, the number of rhizomes per plant, the internode length on vertical rhizomes, and the number of horizontal rhizomes, all increased with increased sand burial. (5) The concentration of chlorophyll in leaves increased exponentially with increased burial. Maximum total chlorophyll (2.3 mg g-1 fresh weight) was found in plants buried to a depth of 23 cm. (6) Most increases in plant cover were found where sand accumulated, while most of the decreases were on stable sites. A multiple regression, in part based on sand burial, accounted for 57% of the variance associated with changes in cover.

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