Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Variation in Seedling Recruitment of Cape Proteaceae after Fire

W. J. Bond, J. Volk and M. Viviers
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 72, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 209-221
DOI: 10.2307/2260014
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2260014
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Variation in Seedling Recruitment of Cape Proteaceae after Fire
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Seedling recruitment of closed cone (serotinous) Proteaceae was surveyed in thirty-one burnt areas in mature mountain fynbos of the Southern Cape, South Africa. (2) The number of seedlings per pre-burn individual (parent) varied greatly from fire to fire. (3) This variability could be partially explained by pre-burn densities since these were frequently negatively correlated with number of seedlings per parent. (4) Seedling recruitment differed significantly with season of fire. The most successful seedling establishment followed autumn burns. Summer burns were often less favourable and had a greater variability from fire to fire. Winter and spring burns lead to very poor seedling establishment, mostly well below replacement levels, so that successive fires in these seasons would rapidly lead to local extinction. (5) Density-dependent regulation of seedling populations is apparently due to the reduction of the reproductive effort, and thus seed reserves, per individual with increased pre-burn crowding. (6) The causes of seasonal variation, which appear to be density independent, have not been satisfactorily explained though they are important for the prediction of fire succession in all Proteaceae which store seed in the canopy.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221