Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Five Co- Existing Grasses

D. S. Veresoglou and A. H. Fitter
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 72, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 259-272
DOI: 10.2307/2260018
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2260018
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Five Co- Existing Grasses
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Shoot growth and phosphorus and potassium uptake into shoots were measured in a group of five co-existing grass species on an acid, lowland grassland, over 2 years. (2) Extractable P and K concentrations in the soil showed pronounced seasonal variation, with P being high and K low in midsummer. (3) There was evidence of the seasonal order of Poa pratensis-Holcus lanatus-Agrostis capillaris for growth and nutrient uptake. Even where dry matter production peaks coincided, peaks of nutrient uptake were separated. (4) Where additional dominant species (Arrhenatherum elatius and Deschampsia cespitosa) were present, the nutrient uptake but not growth of Holcus lanatus was displaced to earlier in the season. Peaks of growth and nutrient uptake of Agrostis capillaris and of Poa pratensis were unaffected and did not overlap those of the dominant species. (5) The responses to temperature and soil moisture in a growth room experiment indicated that the seasonal order (as in (3) above) could be explained by the low temperature resistance of Poa and the drought resistance of Agrostis. (6) Using strontium as a tracer, Poa pratensis was shown to have the shallowest and Agrostis capillaris the deepest root activity. This is more likely to be the explanation for the greater drought resistance of A. capillaris than any physiological attribute.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272