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Journal Article

Foliage-Crown Development and Interaction in Quercus Gilva and Q. Acuta

F. Koike
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 77, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 92-111
DOI: 10.2307/2260919
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2260919
Page Count: 20
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Foliage-Crown Development and Interaction in Quercus Gilva and Q. Acuta
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Abstract

(1) The mechanisms of foliage-crown development and crown-to-crown interactions mediated by light conditions were studied in evergreen oak trees (Quercus gilva and Q. acuta) by actual measurements and simulations. Tree crowns were expressed in terms of a spatial foliage-density distribution, and the course of the interactions was considered as a long-term change of this distribution in each crown. (2) The dynamics of leaf and shoot populations, actual foliage-density distribution of crowns, and light interception by foliage were measured. The finite rate of natural increase in a current-year's shoot population was positively correlated with light conditions. The critical light level, below which shoot population could not be maintained, was about 30% of full light in Q. acuta and about 10% in Q. gilva. Actual light intensity under foliage-crowns of both species was less than that of their critical light level, due to active multiplication of foliage at the canopy surface and light interception by old leaves. (3) The process of crown development was described mathematically as changes in the spatial distribution of foliage density, taking into account light conditions. Such changes were estimated from the leaf area of current-year's shoots, leaf survivorship and shoot population dynamics (i.e. yearly changes in the spatial distribution of shoot population density). All parameters in this model were obtained from actual crowns. The development of interacting foliage-crowns was reproduced by stimulation, using these parameters. (4) In actual foliage-crowns, dense foliage was found in the upper and peripheral parts of the total canopy composed of both crowns, and foliage density was low at the lower side. The crowns encroached upon each other. The border between the two crowns was clear with no infiltration of one into the other. The foliage distribution pattern obtained by simulation was essentially that of the actual crowns.

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