Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Competition and the Coexistence of Species in a Mixed Podocarp Stand

Richard P. Duncan
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 79, No. 4 (Dec., 1991), pp. 1073-1084
DOI: 10.2307/2261099
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2261099
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Competition and the Coexistence of Species in a Mixed Podocarp Stand
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) The importance of intra- and interspecific competition in affecting the growth and survival of Dacrycarpus dacrydioides and Dacrydium cupressinum, the two dominant trees in a mixed podocarp stand in Ohinemaka Forest, south Westland, New Zealand, was investigated. Two lines of evidence (spatial patterning of trees and correlates of tree performance with neighbourhood density) were used to infer the importance of competition. (2) Intraspecific competition among D. dacrydioides trees appeared to be intense. Mean radial growth rate (MGR) was significantly negatively correlated with the number of conspecific neighbours, and patterns of non-random mortality resulted in a shift in spatial pattern from a significantly clumped to a significantly regular distribution. In contrast, intraspecific competition among D. cupressinum was less intense. D. cupressinum had a low rate of mortality, predominatly random spatial patterns of mortality, and a weak correlation between MGR and the number of conspecific neighbours. (3) Differences in the relative importance of intraspecific competition in affecting survival and growth of the two species was attributed to differences in the distribution and availability of suitable establishment sites. D. dacrydioides preferentially established on abundant level or slightly elevated sites, and in patches reached densities where resources were limiting. In contrast, the number and distribution of D. cupressinum were determined primarily by the availability of suitable elevated establishment sites that were scattered throughout the stand. The restricted number of suitable sites limited D. cupressinum to densities where resources were not severely limiting. (4) There was no evidence of interspecific competition. Rather the two species avoided interspecific competition by partitioning the variability in forest-floor micro-relief. Partitioning of sites may permit the coexistence of the two species.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1073
    1073
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1074
    1074
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1075
    1075
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1076
    1076
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1077
    1077
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1078
    1078
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1079
    1079
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1080
    1080
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1081
    1081
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1082
    1082
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1083
    1083
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1084
    1084