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Host-Pathogen Dynamics in Experimental Populations of Silene Alba and Ustilago Violacea. II. Experimental Tests of Theoretical Models

Peter H. Thrall and Andrew M. Jarosz
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 82, No. 3 (Sep., 1994), pp. 561-570
DOI: 10.2307/2261264
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2261264
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Host-Pathogen Dynamics in Experimental Populations of Silene Alba and Ustilago Violacea. II. Experimental Tests of Theoretical Models
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Abstract

1 Experimental populations of Silene alba were established with different total densities, and different frequencies and densities of plants inoculated with anther-smut (Ustilago violacea), a pollinator-transmitted floral disease. 2 Actual changes in the numbers of healthy and infected individuals in the experimental populations were compared with predicted values generated from computer simulations. Four models were tested; these assumed either linear density-dependent, linear frequency-dependent, exponential density-dependent, or exponential frequency-dependent disease transmission. Model parameters were estimated from an independent subset of experimental populations and from earlier field studies. 3 Susceptible and resistant populations had qualitatively different dynamics. Results from the experimental populations were consistent with model predictions that resistant populations would lose the disease, while susceptible hosts and pathogens would coexist. 4 Comparison of the actual changes in the numbers of diseased individuals with model predictions, showed that exponential disease transmission models provided a better overall fit to the data than linear models.

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