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Parental Effects on Progeny Sex Ratio, Emergence, and Flowering in Silene Latifolia (Caryophyllaceae)

Colin B. Purrington
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 81, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 807-811
DOI: 10.2307/2261678
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2261678
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Parental Effects on Progeny Sex Ratio, Emergence, and Flowering in Silene Latifolia (Caryophyllaceae)
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Abstract

1 The dioecious perennial, Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae) was tested to determine whether parental nutrient condition and pollination position affects sex ratio, emergence date, and age at first flowering of the progeny. 2 Parental plants were grown under two nutrient regimes (either full-strength or 25% fertilizer). One flower on each female plant was pollinated on the basal portion of the receptive stigmatic lobes, and another on the distal region. Seeds from the mature capsules were grown in the glasshouse until flowering and emergence date, flowering date, and sex were recored for each individual. 3 Neither the position of pollen application nor the nutrient condition of the parents affected progeny sex ratio. 4 Progeny from low nutrient parents emerged and flowered later than progeny from high nutrient parents. 5 Seeds produced from basal pollinations emerged more slowly than seeds from distal pollinations, suggesting that gametophytic selection affected progeny vigour. 6 Males emerged earlier than females, but flowered at a greater age. The difference in age at flowering between males and females was greater in progeny from low nutrient parents. 7 Parental effects on sexual dimorphism in emergence and maturation time, coupled with sex-specific selection on emergence time and flowering phenology, may thus be important in the population dynamics of this dioecious plant.

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