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Spatial Distribution Patterns of Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) in Corn Fields in Spain

Dionisio Andújar, David Ruiz, Ángela Ribeiro, César Fernández-Quintanilla and José Dorado
Weed Science
Vol. 59, No. 1 (January-March 2011), pp. 82-89
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23018710
Page Count: 8
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Abstract

This study describes the distribution patterns of Johnsongrass populations present in 38 commercial corn fields located in three major corn growing regions of Spain. A total of 232 ha were visually assessed from the cabin of a combine during harvesting using a three-category ranking (high density, low density, no presence) and recording the georeferenced data in a tablet personal computer. On average, 10.3 and 3.9% of the surveyed area were infested with high and low density of Johnsongrass, respectively. Most of the infested area was concentrated in a few large patches with irregular shape. Small patches (less than 1,000 m 2 ) represented only 27% of the infested area. Management factors could explain much of the spatial distribution of this weed in the studied fields. Tillage direction was the main factor explaining patch shape: the length width −1 ratio of the patches was greater than two in the tillage direction. In sprinkler irrigated fields, higher levels of infestation were generally observed close to the sprinkler lines. Areas close to the edges of the field had a higher risk of infestation than the areas in the middle of the fields: a negative relationship between distance from the edge and weed abundance was established. Because a few patches, located in some predictable parts of the field, such as field edges, represent most of the seriously infested area, site-specific treatments of these areas could reduce herbicide inputs, until more reliable, spatially precise and practical detection, mapping, and spraying systems are developed.

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