Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

MORPHOLOGY AND TAXONOMIC STATUS OF TWO LITTLE-KNOWN NEMATODE SPECIES PARASITIZING NORTH AMERICAN FISHES

František Moravec, Céline Levron and Isaure de Buron
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 97, No. 2 (APRIL 2011), pp. 297-304
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23019079
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
MORPHOLOGY AND TAXONOMIC STATUS OF TWO LITTLE-KNOWN NEMATODE SPECIES PARASITIZING NORTH AMERICAN FISHES
Preview not available

Abstract

Examination of some freshwater and brackishwater (estuarine) fishes in South Carolina in October 2009 yielded, in addition to other parasites, 2 little-known nematode species identified as Dichelyne fastigatus Chandler, 1935 (Cucullanidae), from the red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus (Linnaeus), from an estuary, and Rhabdochona ovifilamenta Weller, 1938 (Rhabdochonidae), from the shorthead redhorse, Moxostoma macrolepidotum (Lesueur), from Lake Moultrie. Light and scanning electron microscopy (the latter used for the first time for these species) made it possible to describe several important, but previously unreported, taxonomic features in D. fastigatus, such as the location of the excretory pore and deirids, the shape of deirids and a gubernaculum, the shape and size of eggs, the presence of precloacal ventral oblique muscle bands, and 11 pairs of caudal papillae and a pair of phasmids. It distinctly differs from the most similar Dichelyne cotylophora (Ward and Magath, 1917), a parasite of North American freshwater percids, in the number and arrangement of postanal papillae and by a markedly elevated cloacal region. Records of Dichelyne lintoni Barreto, 1922, from S. ocellatus probably concern D. fastigatus. Examination of R. ovifilamenta revealed a high degree of morphologic and biometric variability in this species. Based on our analysis, Rhabdochona laurentiana Lyster, 1940, Rhabdochona milleri Choquette, 1951, and Rhabdochona catostomi Kayton, Kritsky, and Tobias, 1979, are synonymized with R. ovifilamenta Weller, 1938, typically a parasite of North American catostomids.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304