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Effects of Listening Conditions, Error Types, and Ensemble Textures on Error Detection Skills

Dori T. Waggoner
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 59, No. 1 (April 2011), pp. 56-71
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23019437
Page Count: 16
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Effects of Listening Conditions, Error Types, and Ensemble Textures on Error Detection Skills
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Abstract

This study was designed with three main purposes: (a) to investigate the effects of two listening conditions on error detection accuracy, (b) to compare error detection responses for rhythm errors and pitch errors, and (c) to examine the influences of texture on error detection accuracy. Undergraduate music education students (N = 18) listened to purposefully incorrect performances of band literature in two formats, on recordings and while conducting a live ensemble. Pitch and rhythm errors were inserted into the music excerpts to investigate responses to different types of errors. Half of the excerpts were played by the full ensemble and half by a single section. Participants served as their own controls by completing the error detection tasks under all conditions. Results indicated that participants were significantly more successful in identifying errors in the recording condition than in the conducting condition. A significant interaction existed between the error type (pitch or rhythm) and the ensemble texture (single section or full ensemble). Participants identified rhythm errors more accurately in the single section texture and diagnosed pitch errors more successfully in the full ensemble excerpts.

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