Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

REVISION OF LYRACYSTID EOCRINOIDS FROM THE MIDDLE CAMBRIAN OF SOUTH CHINA AND WESTERN LAURENTIA

JAMES SPRINKLE, RONALD L. PARSLEY, YUANLONG ZHAO and JIN PENG
Journal of Paleontology
Vol. 85, No. 2 (MARCH 2011), pp. 250-255
Published by: Paleontological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23020041
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
REVISION OF LYRACYSTID EOCRINOIDS FROM THE MIDDLE CAMBRIAN OF SOUTH CHINA AND WESTERN LAURENTIA
Preview not available

Abstract

The Middle Cambrian eocrinoid genera Lyracystis Sprinkle and Collins, 2006, from western Laurentia and Balangicystis Parsley and Zhao, 2006, from South China, described in the same year, have turned out to be closely related genera assigned to the Family Lyracystidae. Both have erect, lyre-shaped, arm-like, brachiole-bearing, feeding appendages, here termed exothecal ambulacra, that are not homologous to crinoid arms. They also have a long, multiplated stalk to elevate the theca and feeding appendages well above the sea floor, making them among the highest tiered echinoderm suspension feeders known from the Middle Cambrian. The long stalk was either inserted a short distance into the muddy sediment, or attached to rare skeletal fragments lying on the sea floor. Both genera seem well adapted to quiet-water or slow-current conditions in deeper water (150—200 m) on the outer shelf or upper slope of their respective continents.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
251
    251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
252
    252
  • Thumbnail: Page 
253
    253
  • Thumbnail: Page 
254
    254
  • Thumbnail: Page 
255
    255