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WORKING MOTHERS: SOME CONSEQUENCES FROM A FIRST AND SECOND GRADERS' PERSPECTIVE

ORIT ICHILOV and CHANA SHADMI
International Journal of Sociology of the Family
Vol. 16, No. 2 (Autumn 1986), pp. 273-289
Published by: International Journals
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23027751
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
WORKING MOTHERS: SOME CONSEQUENCES FROM A FIRST AND SECOND GRADERS' PERSPECTIVE
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Abstract

The present study examined the extent to which first and second graders whose mothers are gainfully employed outside the household, express feelings of deprivation concerning some basic daily routines as compared with children whose mothers are housewives. We also examined the factors which are related to satisfaction with mothers' work among children of working mothers. We interviewed 150 first and second graders in four schools in the greater Tel-Aviv area, 98 of which were children of employed mothers. The comparison between children of working and non-working mothers revealed that even though differences in daily routine existed, similar levels of satisfaction with the existing situation were reported in the two groups. Among children of working mothers it was found that children whose mothers are full-time employed, feel more deprived concerning feeding arrangements and time spent with mother, than children whose mothers are part-time employed. However, none of the antecedent variables, including scope of mothers employment, was significantly related to childrens' overall satisfaction with mothers' employment.

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