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GENDER ROLES, NEGOTIATIONS AND COPING STRATEGIES: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF TWO-INCOME COUPLES

GURJEET K. GILL
International Journal of Sociology of the Family
Vol. 23, No. 2 (Autumn 1993), pp. 51-65
Published by: International Journals
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23029653
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
GENDER ROLES, NEGOTIATIONS AND COPING STRATEGIES: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF TWO-INCOME COUPLES
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Abstract

This paper explores the ideology of gender roles, negotiations and strategies employed by two-income couples in order to cope with the demand of housework. Using in-depth interviewing and structured questionnaire data were collected from a sample of 35 two-income couples with children of all age. Ideology of gender role varied as one-third of the couples felt that ideally, only husband should be the main provider. On the other hand, the remaining couples agreed that either husband or wife or both could provide for the family. Interestingly, however, in the families studied husbands and wives performed their roles as providers and contributors, respectively. Although housework was perceived as a shared responsibility, wives were responsible and performed a majority of the household tasks. A seven step model based on the process of negotiation of housework was developed. 'Helper-accountable' roles were negotiated as one typical coping strategy by husbands and wives during the housework performance. These findings confirm and extend the existing dichotomy of gender relations masculine-feminine and provider-nurturer roles to provider-contributor and helper-accountable roles.

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