Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Global habitat suitability models of terrestrial mammals

Carlo Rondinini, Moreno Di Marco, Federica Chiozza, Giulia Santulli, Daniele Baisero, Piero Visconti, Michael Hoffmann, Jan Schipper, Simon N. Stuart, Marcelo F. Tognelli, Giovanni Amori, Alessandra Falcucci, Luigi Maiorano and Luigi Boitani
Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences
Vol. 366, No. 1578, Global strategies for the conservation of mammals (27 September 2011), pp. 2633-2641
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23035699
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Global habitat suitability models of terrestrial mammals
Preview not available

Abstract

Detailed large-scale information on mammal distribution has often been lacking, hindering conservation efforts. We used the information from the 2009 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as a baseline for developing habitat suitability models for 5027 out of 5330 known terrestrial mammal species, based on their habitat relationships. We focused on the following environmental variables: land cover, elevation and hydrological features. Models were developed at 300 m resolution and limited to within species' known geographical ranges. A subset of the models was validated using points of known species occurrence. We conducted a global, fine-scale analysis of patterns of species richness. The richness of mammal species estimated by the overlap of their suitable habitat is on average one-third less than that estimated by the overlap of their geographical ranges. The highest absolute difference is found in tropical and subtropical regions in South America, Africa and Southeast Asia that are not covered by dense forest. The proportion of suitable habitat within mammal geographical ranges correlates with the IUCN Red List category to which they have been assigned, decreasing monotonically from Least Concern to Endangered. These results demonstrate the importance of fine-resolution distribution data for the development of global conservation strategies for mammals.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
2633
    2633
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2634
    2634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2635
    2635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2636
    2636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2637
    2637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2638
    2638
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2639
    2639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2640
    2640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2641
    2641