Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Study of Cognitive Complexity in the Education for Social Work Practice

WAYNE D. DUEHN and ENOLA K. PROCTOR
Journal of Education for Social Work
Vol. 10, No. 2 (SPRING 1974), pp. 20-26
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23038392
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($44.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Study of Cognitive Complexity in the Education for Social Work Practice
Preview not available

Abstract

This study investigates cognitive complexity in interpersonal discriminations as it relates to selected aspects of the decision-making process in social work practice. Differences in data transmission and selection of interventive activities between graduate social work students who scored high on Carr's Interpersonal Discrimination Test were compared with those who scored low. As predicted, subjects who scored high on interpersonal discrimination transmitted more information about clients dissimilar to themselves and specified a greater number of interventive alternatives than did those who scored low. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of selection for the profession and in the identification and ordering of learning experiences in the curriculum.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26